Teenage Georgia high school baseball star Jeremy Medina dies days after doctors declared him brain dead when freak batting cage accident left him in a com

A Georgia high school baseball star has died days after doctors declared him brain dead in a horrific batting cage accident.

Jeremy Medina, 18, was on life support at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville after being hit in the head with a bat on Nov. 20 and falling into a coma.

The teen’s family said he went into cardiac arrest on Monday.

“Unfortunately, his heart stopped last night about an hour before his grandmother arrived. We know that Jeremy is and always will be in God’s hands and we will see him soon,” the family said in a statement posted on Facebook Tuesday.

Gainesville High School Principal Jamie Greene explained that the accident occurred when Medina leaned toward the batting cage net as the batter swung.

A Georgia high school baseball star has died days after doctors declared him brain dead in a horrific accident in the batting cage.

A Georgia high school baseball star has died days after doctors declared him brain dead in a horrific accident in the batting cage.

The 18-year-old was on life support at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville after being hit in the head with a bat on Nov. 20 and falling into a coma.

The 18-year-old was on life support at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville after being hit in the head with a bat on Nov. 20 and falling into a coma.

The teenager's family said he went into cardiac arrest on Monday and died just an hour before his grandmother came to visit him.

The teenager’s family said he went into cardiac arrest on Monday and died just an hour before his grandmother came to visit him.

Medina’s family announced his tragic death in an emotional message just days after he was declared brain dead.

“Following the press conference last week and the decision to support Jeremy’s organ donation wishes, we have begun the process of obtaining a visa for his grandmother so she can come with us on the honorary walk,” the statement said.

“Unfortunately, his heart stopped last night about an hour before his grandmother arrived. We know that Jeremy is and always will be in God’s hands and we will see him soon.

“We are grateful for all the prayers and support over the past three weeks and we appreciate everyone’s understanding as we take time to be with our family at this time.”

Funeral plans for the teen have not been announced, but his family said they would share updates about his tribute.

Medina, who played pitcher and catcher, fell into an induced coma after being hit in the head.

Dr. Michael Cormican, director of the hospital’s surgical intensive care unit, explained how the medical team made the decision to declare the student brain dead during a Dec. 6 press conference.

Through a “highly regimented” process, doctors looked for evidence of brain function through reflexes and breathing, and used imaging to assess blood flow to the brain. He was pronounced dead on Sunday.

Funeral plans for the teen have not been announced, but his family said they would share updates about his tribute.

Funeral plans for the teen have not been announced, but his family said they would share updates about his tribute.

Medina's family spoke at a press conference on December 6.  In attendance were uncle Efrahim

Medina’s family spoke at a press conference on December 6. In attendance were uncle Efrahim “Frank” Medina, father David Medina, brother David Medina Jr. and aunt Ludine DeAza (from left).

A few days after the accident, Medina's brother posted a video on Instagram of the two of them playing as children.

He captioned the post:

A few days after the accident, Medina’s brother posted a video on Instagram of the two of them playing as children. He captioned the post: “Please wake up for me.”

“The initial trauma to his head was severe and caused him to lose consciousness, and when he lost consciousness, he lost the ability to maintain his airway,” Cormican said.

He said Medina’s prognosis was “not unique” for serious head trauma.

The teen’s father David Medina, uncle Efrahim “Frank” Medina, aunt Ludine DeAza and brother David Jr. attended the conference along with dozens of supporters.

Medina’s relatives sat with their heads down. At one point, David Jr. pulled his sweatshirt over his face and cried.

The family previously said it would honor Medina’s wishes to donate his organs.

“Before his passing, Jeremy made the decision to give the gift of life by registering as an organ and tissue donor when he received his driver’s license,” Frank Medina said.

“Not only will lives be saved and improved, but the families, friends and communities of those who receive his organs and tissue will forever be impacted by the memories made possible by a second chance at life.”

Frank Medina added that Medina’s body will be given a walk of honor by loved ones as it is taken into the operating room for the organ donation procedure, after which it will be buried.

Principal Green said counselors and social workers will be available to support students and staff “for as long as needed.”

He thanked Medina’s family for notifying the teen’s baseball teammates, coaches and teachers of his passing earlier that morning.

“You have been a great inspiration to us with your faith and your leadership,” Green said. “It has helped me lead the school community during this very difficult time.”

Cormican also praised their strength, saying he was especially moved as the father of a teenage boy.

“It was inspiring to see how they handled it with grace and prayerful thought,” Cormican said.

When David Medina took the podium and introduced himself as “Father Jeremy,” his voice broke.

He said the family relied on their religious faith during the harrowing ordeal and stressed his son’s injuries were the result of an accident.

Frank Medina said his loved ones will receive a walk of honor as Medina's body is taken into the operating room to donate his organs.

Frank Medina said his loved ones will receive a walk of honor as Medina’s body is taken into the operating room to donate his organs.

David Medina said the family relied on their religious faith throughout the ordeal and reiterated that his son's injuries were the result of an accident.

David Medina said the family relied on their religious faith throughout the ordeal and reiterated that his son’s injuries were the result of an accident.

Gainesville High School Principal Jamie Greene said counselors will be available for staff and students as they process the news of Medina's passing.

Gainesville High School Principal Jamie Greene said counselors will be available for staff and students as they process the news of Medina’s passing.

That same day, Gainesville High School posted a message that said, in part: “Jeremy Medina’s life will forever impact our entire community. His passing will mean the resumption of life as an organ donor for many others. Please continue to pray for the Medina family.”

Attached to the message was what would have been Medina’s senior yearbook photo and accompanying portrait.

Gainesville Theater Company 2445 has announced that a Dec. 6 performance of “Cinderella” will be performed in honor of the baseball star, with a portion of sales from the boutique going to Medina’s family.

Community members rallied around Medina and his family long before his death was announced.

Supporters used the hashtags “#pray4jeremy” and “#OneGainesville” as they waited with bated breath for his recovery.

Adam Miller, Medina’s former coach, called the teenager “a great kid, a great teammate and a great ballplayer” in a Facebook post.

“I will never forget his smile and love for the game. He and his family have been a blessing to me,” Miller wrote, urging others to pray for him.

The 18-year-old’s love for the sport showed on social media, where he often posted photos of himself in a baseball uniform.

Medina’s brother, a fellow baseball player, posted a video on his Instagram story days after the accident of the duo acting out as children.

The video was captioned: “Please wake up for me.”