The one thing Aussies are crying out for after a massive immigration surge – as Anthony Albanese makes a series of changes

Australians want the government to freeze migrant intake until schools, roads, homes and hospitals can be built to accommodate them, a new poll says.

A poll of 1,000 respondents by the Institute of Public Affairs found that 60 percent supported a temporary suspension of immigration “until the economic and social infrastructure for them can be built.”

The proposal was most supported by Australians in the over 65 and 35-44 age groups. Some 23 per cent of respondents were against the idea, while 17 per cent were unsure about suspending immigration for the first time since Covid border closures in 2020 and 2021.

The poll results were published on Monday morning – the same day Labor revealed details of its crackdown on immigration.

More than 400,000 migrants move to Australia each year and new data to be released this week is expected to show a record annual net influx of 500,000 people in 2022-23.

This figure would include 195,000 permanent arrivals, with the bulk of the long-term influx made up of international students.

Home Affairs Minister Claire O’Neill on Monday announced the abolition of student visas and a “visa transition” while making it easier for highly skilled migrants to work in Australia as part of an overhaul aimed at fixing a “broken” migration system.

Australia will face a housing shortage of at least 252,800 units by 2028, according to an IPA report.

Australia will face a housing shortage of at least 252,800 units by 2028, according to an IPA report.

The IPA poll found that around 71 per cent of respondents agreed they were “concerned about the current influx of migrants making it more difficult for young Australians to afford their own home”.

Young people aged 18-24 had the lowest level of agreement with this statement at 68 percent, while 77 percent of people over 65 agreed.

Only 12 percent disagreed with the proposal, and 17 percent again expressed uncertainty.

Some 33 per cent of respondents said the government had struck the right balance with migration over the next five years when asked for their view of an estimated 1.5 million more migrants arriving in Australia by 2028.

62 percent said it was too many people, and only five percent said it wasn’t enough.

The survey comes after the government announced a further change over the weekend that foreigners who buy homes in Australia and leave them empty will suffer a huge tax rise.

It’s designed to get rid of so-called “ghost mansions” in some of Australia’s wealthiest suburbs – homes that remain empty as owners watch their values ​​rise.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers is also set to announce plans to ease the rental crisis, such as cutting fees paid by overseas investors who want to build homes to rent.

On Saturday Mr Albanese said the government would return immigration to what he believes is a sustainable level after a huge rise since Covid.

He said the overhaul followed a review that found Australia’s immigration system was “badly broken” and needed a 10-year overhaul.

“We know we need a migration system that allows Australia to gain the skills we need, but also ensures the system works in the interests of all Australians,” he said.

Shadow Immigration and Citizenship Minister Dan Tehan told The Washington News Australia he sympathizes with ordinary Australians already feeling the pinch due to the cost of living crisis.

Shadow Immigration and Citizenship Minister Dan Tehan told The Washington News Australia he sympathizes with ordinary Australians already feeling the pinch due to the cost of living crisis.

The Prime Minister has said there will always be a surge in immigration after Covid-19, but current forecasts are lower than before Australia closed its borders during the pandemic.

Treasury forecasts also showed that receipts were expected to fall significantly in the next financial year.

A review led by former head of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet Martin Parkinson found abuses in Australia’s admissions of international students.

“People come here signing up for courses that don’t really add significantly to their professional base or the national interest here,” Mr. Albanese said.

“It is therefore not in the interests of our neighbors and not in the interests of Australia that there should not be a crackdown on this. We are determined to do this.”

He said the review “found that it was a deliberate decision to neglect the system and that, in Parkinson’s opinion, it was so badly broken that it required a 10-year overhaul.” Well, we’re determined to fix that.”

Among the changes to be announced in the coming days will be stricter English language proficiency requirements for students.

Opposition immigration spokesman Dan Tehan told The Washington News Australia he sympathized with ordinary Australians already feeling the pinch as the cost of living crisis hit.

“Australians who can’t find a place to live or are struggling to pay multiple rent increases are asking Labor: where will all these people live?” He said.

Mr Tehan said this new IPA data pointed to another example of the Labor Party “making a mess of immigration” following the November 8 High Court ruling which allowed 148 asylum seekers, some of whom were described as habitual criminals, to move freely throughout the community. .

At least five have already been charged or arrested in connection with the crimes.

The Washington News Australia reports that 60 percent of respondents favored a temporary freeze on new immigrants

The Washington News Australia reports that 60 percent of respondents favored a temporary freeze on new immigrants “until more economic and social infrastructure such as schools, roads, hospitals and homes can be built.”

Net migration increased sharply, while natural population growth steadily declined.

Net migration increased sharply, while natural population growth steadily declined.

“Labor says it doesn’t want a big Australia, but they are judged by their actions, not their words,” he said.

The IPA report said that over the past three decades, governments have increasingly relied on population growth to drive economic growth, but per capita growth, as a direct measure of living standards, has actually slowed.

This means that while the situation in Australia looks better on paper, most households are actually feeling the pinch more than in the past.

On a per capita basis, Australians are about $7,848 poorer in 2023, according to the study.

The report found that “Australia’s labor productivity fell by about 3.6 percent in FY2023 – the worst decline since at least 1980 – while the country experienced its highest population growth on record.”

The government’s commitment to welcoming migrants will lead to 1.75 million more people living in Australia by 2023, according to the study.

“This influx of migrants will exacerbate the current housing crisis facing Australians and recent migrants themselves,” the report said.

“The IPA study estimates that Australia will face a housing shortage of at least 252,800 housing units over this period.”

Speaking about the data, Institute of Public Affairs deputy chief executive Daniel Wild said the mass migration program is “damaging the daily lives of the average Australian through congestion on our roads and shortages of housing, childcare, and key health services.

“Australia needs a proper debate about the scale of our migration program, which has grown at an unprecedented rate without planning or public consent.

“Australia is the most welcoming and tolerant country in the world and migration will always be critical, but it must be planned and implemented in accordance with our national values.”

The Treasury in the May Budget forecast net overseas migration to be 315,000 in 2023-24, but net arrivals of 429,580 in the year to September shows the population is still growing at a faster rate than forecast.